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Is Apple helping its apps cheat in the App Store?

via:cnBeta     time:2021/11/20 11:01:04     readed:66

According to The Verge, how can companies salvage their reputations if an app's ratings are too low?Apple just found an incredibly effective way to get listeners to submit better reviews, interrupting their podcast experience with in-app prompts to submit reviews.

That's how the Apple Podcasts App went from publicly embarrassing 1.8 stars to 4.6 stars in just over a month without any actual fixes, as developer and App Store watchdog Kosta Eleftheriou points out. And it's on the rise: According to AppFigures, the app has been getting thousands of ratings every day since November 9, the vast majority of which are 5 stars.

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So far, the App has an overall rating of 4.7 stars and is firmly in the App Store. Podcast & quot; Top of search results. For new users, it looks more attractive than ever.

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But do these people really like Apple Podcasts?Because if you actually look at the comments, there seems to be something interesting going on. There were some new, positive reviews, but they weren't reviews of Apple's podcasting app at all -- they were reviews of podcasting itself.

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This is the highest review of Apple Podcasts on the App Store:

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Here are some more "up to date" comments on the Apple Podcasts app:

"Great show! "SammyAls wrote. Lively and well-researched. " "He added. Energetic and much needed! I like this one. "

" Mobley has depth and insight." Xbacksideslider wrote. " It's great to hear podcasts with ideas and facts. Stay away from the emotional appeals of shallow jealousy and self-congratulatory fake sympathy that dominate popular culture. "

Jkimble6091 said: & quot; As a young millionaire in the future, listening to Anthony Oneal keeps me on track through all the ups and downs of life. "

The Verge wondered if this might be a common confusion with podcast apps, where listeners think they're commenting on a podcast, not The app itself.But no, when your correspondent checked the reviews of other top podcasting apps on the App Store, he didn't see a clear pattern.Almost every review of a competing app is a review of the app itself.

Apple confirmed to The Verge that it's using a new tip, but claims there's nothing unusual about it. "With the release of iOS 15.1 last month, Apple Podcasts began prompting listeners to leave ratings and reviews, much like most third-party apps do -- using standard ratings and review prompts that are available to all developers," a spokesperson said.

Intentional or not, standard or not, The problem with star ratings is that there's no way to tell if they're legitimate, according to The Verge.The reporter said it was unclear whether anyone hit the five star button because they liked the app, or thought they were rating the podcast itself, or just wanted to turn off the prompt as soon as possible.Nor is it known whether Apple is prompting everyone, or just its most loyal fans, or some subset of other algorithms that just happen to give it an edge. Some bad actors have reportedly even purchased star ratings for their egregious App Store scams, which are impossible for most App Store shoppers to tell apart.

In Apple Podcasts, The company is using The same broken star rating system to elevate scammers for its own benefit, The Verge commented. This is a very clear example of why people can't trust star ratings.

(Original headline: Report says Apple finds' effective way 'to Boost Apple podcasting App ratings in App Store)

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